Putting Young People's Mental Health Centre Stage

Our Mission

To prevent children and young people from becoming socially excluded due to mental ill health or emotional distress and to relieve the needs of those children and young people with mental ill health or emotional distress and assist them to integrate into society.

Our Goals

  • Remove the stigma attached to mental illness
  • Make conversation about mental illness normal, supportive and therapeutic
  • Promote social inclusion rather than feelings of isolation for young people with mental illness or emotional distress


Our Work

The Grey Dog Trust was set up with the aim of tackling the stigma attached to mental illness and making the conversation about it as natural as talking about physical illness with the focus on young people. Mental illness can be distressing and makes people feel socially isolated. We aim to use the medium of music to open up the conversation and do this in a way that encourages social inclusion. 


The first part of our strategy is to put on a free entry music festival. The Grey Dog Festival will be set up in the same way as any other music festival but with one major difference. Each of the acts performing on the main stage will be specifically selected for not only their musical ability but also the fact they are willing to talk openly to the audience about their own experience of living with mental illness or caring for someone with mental illness. 


Young people look up to and respect the musicians they listen to and see them as role models. Therefore, what better way to role model open and honest discussion than by hearing those people they look up to talking to a whole crowd about it.

 

The Grey Dog Festival will take place in Northamptonshire in August.

Statistic Relating To Young People's Mental Health

•1 in 10 children have a diagnosable mental health disorder – that’s roughly 3 children in every classroom (1)


 •1 in 5 young adults have a diagnosable mental health disorder (2) 


50% of all mental health problems manifest by the age of 14, with 75% by age 24 (3) 


Almost 1 in 4 children and young people show some evidence of mental ill health (including anxiety and depression) (4) 


Suicide is the most common cause of death for boys aged between 5-19 years, and the second most common for girls of this age (5)


 •1 in 12 young people self-harm at some point in their lives, though there is evidence that this could be a lot higher. Girls are more likely to self-harm than boys. (6) 


•3 in 4 children with a diagnosable mental health condition do not get access to the support that they need (7)

  

 •The average maximum waiting time for a first appointment with CAMHS is 6 months and nearly 10 months until the start of treatment (8) 


•CAMHS are turning away nearly a quarter (23%) of children referred to them for treatment by concerned parents, GPs, teachers and others (9) 


•Just 0.7% of the NHS budget is spent on children’s mental health (10) and only 16% of this is spent on early intervention (11) 

References

   1 Green H et al (2005) Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. 


2 Green H et al (2005) Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.


3. Kessler RC et al. (2005). ‘Lifetime Prevalence and Age-of-Onset Distributions of DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication’.  


4. ONS (2016) Selected Children’s Well-being Measures by Country: 3 CentreForum (2016) Commission on Child


5. Wolfe et al (2014, Why children die: death in infants, children and young people in the UK).


6. Brooks, F. et al. (2015) HBSC England National Report 2014. University of Hertfordshire; Hatfield, UK.  


7. Green H et al (2005) Mental health of children and young people in Great Britain, 2004. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. 


8. Frith, E. (2016) CentreForum Commission on Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation 


9. Frith, E. (2016) CentreForum Commission on Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation


10. https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Mental-Health-Taskforce-FYFV-final.pdf 


11. Frith, E. (2016) CentreForum Commission on Children and Young People’s Mental Health: State of the Nation  

Need Someone To Talk To?

A list of helplines and websites where you can find information, help or just someone to listen.

Childline Comforts, advises and protects children 24 hours a day and offers free confidential counselling.  Phone 0800 1111 (24 hours)  Chat 1-2-1 with a counsellor online     


The Mix  Information, support and listening for people under 25.  Phone 0808 808 4994 (24 hours)  Get support online


Youth Access  Get connected with the right support services and organisations in your area. For anyone aged 11-25.  Visit their website to find your local service.    


Samaritans  24 hour confidential listening and support for anyone who needs it. (Adults included.)

jo@samaritans.org  

Phone 116 123 (24 hours)


Headmeds   Straight talk on mental health medication


https://www.headmeds.org.uk/


B-eat   The UK's eating disorder charity. They have online support groups and a helpline for anyone under 18.  Phone 0345 634 7650 (4pm – 10pm 365 days a year)  Email fyp@b-eat.co.uk

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